Blog - Page 18 of 18 - Kara Lambert

33 Why you aren’t getting the sales on Facebook any more

7 reasons you dont sell on Facebook

Facebook is social media, not a sales platform. Here are 7 ways to be social, increase interaction & drive sales.

Facebook, although it has the plug-ins for shops, is not a reliable way to sell; it doesn’t pass on notifications or messages, it loses comments & if it gets really huffy it will stop you from accessing/commenting/posting. The main problem with selling exclusively on Facebook is that the content below your main page level (photos, shops, events) is not indexed for internet searches, so unless a person is on Facebook (and many people aren’t) your business is not going to make a sale. Facebook is part of the group of social media platforms, in the beginning it was quite easy to generate sales, however, user behaviour is changing. Facebook is returning to a social medium, where people escape from their chaotic/dreary/mundane lives. So, how can you help them to escape AND generate engagement, customer base and sales?

1. Laugh

Make them laugh, share a joke, share a funny photo, share a funny story. It turns frowns upside down. Best of all, research shows that if you help someone feel better, you feel better too.

~ People like to laugh; it releases chemicals in our brain that make us feel good. ~

2. Cry

I haven’t done this on my pages, but I have seen it done quite successfully. I have seen businesses share their struggles with cancer, when they have welcomed a new family member into their arms (be it a human or fur baby), when they have said goodbye to a family member, or when they just don’t feel as if they can continue their business.

I am not suggesting that your posts always relate to these things, too much doom and gloom does not make for a very sociable page. I’m also not suggesting that you whinge about not being seen in Facebook feeds, or declining sales – that said, I have seen a great spin on driving sales by tying the need for sales to fund a common purpose (buying a special birthday gift, wanting a new appliance). Just make yourself approachable.

3. Relate

I do this on my other business page, where most of my customers are parents. I share with them things I have done to make my life easier. I share with them if I have a bad day and need another coffee (or am waiting until bedtime/wine o’clock). I know of businesses that get fabulous interaction from sharing their struggles with mental illness, cyber-bullying or David & Goliath stories. It creates rapport and if your customers ever see you face-to-face it means that you have one less barrier to overcome – trust. If they feel that they already know you, that you are like a friend, then they can trust you.

~ People like to know that you are a real person, that you are not some faceless selling machine. ~ (Tweet this!)

4. Applaud

Certainly applaud your successes – business award nominations and signing a major retail customer instil confidence through third-party endorsement. Applaud customers who share their creations using your products, show them how proud you are that they have succeeded (and you have helped them to get there). Applaud friends in business, celebrate their triumphs and share the love. Remember that helping others makes you feel good long after the act of helping is over.

5. Teach

Set up a regular post and teach your customers something that relates directly to your business. My other business is making hair accessories and every Sunday night I share a hair tutorial I have found. Sometimes it is a way to improve a technique, sometimes it is a new technique, and sometimes it’s a new style. I have likers who tune in every Sunday just to see the tutorial. My likers will comment, tag and share the tutorials; all of which increase engagement on my page, improving my Edgerank and how often Facebook shows the page in Newsfeeds. I will occasionally share styles that use accessories and I will link to the related accessory in the post comments.

If you are in a service industry teach them something about what you do or teach them what they need to do to make working with you easier (eg. an accountant shares an idea on organising receipts for tax time). Teaching creates a relationship and trust; it shows customers that you are willing to share what you know with them.

~ Teaching opens a door. ~

6. Inspire

On my other business page I do this when I am making my kids’ birthday cakes. I share the photos of the cakes my kids want to have and how they end up. My customers love it, they are parents and like to see that human side and where my ideas come from (I share blogs I use for inspiration).

On Monday mornings I share an inspirational quote, an affirmation or a wish. It removes a feeling of doom and gloom often linked to Mondays. It makes me feel good as I believe that it will make someone’s day better and it reminds me of how I want to live my life.

Inspiring others not only lifts the other person up, it lifts you up.

7. Share

Ask them to share your page, ask them to share their fears, ask them to share ideas on how to use your product or ask them to share photos of themselves using your product.
Share your website, share products from your website, or share your blog from your website. Ask them to share their favourite items from your site in one post, get them to share it publicly in their newsfeed and to use a specific hashtag for it so you can see. Sharing your website does a number of things:

– it drives traffic to your site

– it increases your Edgeranking by linking to a verified source, and

– it is where your checkout is and where the buyers need to be.

~ People love to share things, so ask them to share. ~ (Tweet this!)

Facebook is a fabulous marketing tool, but it’s just that, a way to market your business. It is not a reliable way to sell your product. There are sociable ways to incorporate sales into your Facebook content; you just need to think socially.

Let me know in the comments what other ways you like to be sociable on your Facebook business page.

Want to learn more about writing for Facebook? Follow our two part series on finding your online voice.

4 Why you can write your own content for your website

Write to Right - The art of a proofreaderCopywriters are great, but they don’t know your business. When you are developing a business website, it needs to speak your customer’s language. It needs to be an extension of who you are offline. I don’t know of a better person to articulate that than you.

A business website is there to sell your products or services when you can’t be. Sure a copywriter can be briefed, they know the right words to use to get great search results, they can say the same thing a dozen different ways; but are they the right people to be selling your business?
If you were to engage a copywriter you would need to brief them on the ‘who, what, why’ of ‘you, your business and your customer’. Sounds to me you are doing a lot of the writing already.

What do you need to do instead?
Know your customer. How old are they? Are they a particular gender? Are they educated? What do they do for work? What problem are they coming to you to fix? How do they like to shop?

Know your product or service. What is it? How will it help your customer? How does it solve their problems? Why is it different?

Know your competition. How do they solve customer problems? How do they do things differently?

Know yourself. What image do you want to portray?

In my years of e-business project management I learnt to talk to the business first. They hold the knowledge and the vision, not the person building the widget.

From here all I can advise is to plan, write & review. If you will be maintaining your own website don’t be afraid to try different writing styles or tone; by experimenting you will soon see what appeals to your customers. Please plan your writing. Plan what website pages you will have, how your customers will use them (not just read them) & what you want to gain from the page. Put your customer first when you are writing.

– Put your customer first when you are writing. – (Tweet it!)

Remember that people want to know “What’s in it for me?” so tell them how they will benefit. You are the one who knows best how they will benefit. Plan the content. Write the most important benefits at the top of the page. Use visual cues, like bold or italic font, to keep their eye active and moving down the page. Plan these cues when you are planning your page.
Draft your pages in a word processing program. You can copy & paste from most and keep the formatting. You can move paragraphs around and remove any duplicated information.
Check your pages against your plan. Does it meet the customer’s needs? Will it adequately sell your business when you aren’t physically online? Leave it overnight and check it again tomorrow. Have it proofread (you knew I would mention it somewhere). After you have uploaded it to your site, give it a few weeks, a few months and review the page. Does it still help your business? Repeat the cycle.

– Plan, write, check, repeat – (Tweet it!)

Write to Right offer a range of proofreading and editing services for documents and specialised packages for websites. If you choose to write your own content, it’s prudent to have someone else check your work. Let Write to Right make your business communication its best.

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I Won’t Hire People Who Use Poor Grammar. Here’s Why.

“Good grammar is credibility, especially on the internet. In blog posts, on Facebook statuses, in e-mails, and on company websites, your words are all you have. They are a projection of you in your physical absence.”
Your website is promoting your business 24/7, the words that form the site should not be letting down your business.

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