Websites Archives - Kara Lambert

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3 tips to maximise your first media coverage

During the week I asked my friends and my Facebook group: What they would do next after their business was featured on national tv. I was wondering how and if businesses had thought about maximising their media coverage. The results were interesting.

For most it would be their first media coverage and to be honest, it can be daunting. While not necessarily press coverage, I remember seeing my first piece of associated press and not only was I over the moon, but I was completely daunted by the company I was keeping. Seems my reactions were not dissimilar to those I asked.

Most small business owners said that they would celebrate, cry, scream; essentially we all run through a range of emotions. Which is perfectly normal when we get that first media coverage, but then what? How do the best small business maximise their media coverage?

Get your website ready to cope with the media coverage

Some of the people said they’d check to make sure that their website could handle the increased traffic after receiving the press coverage. While the ability to handle the load is important, you need to maximise the press coverage too. Here are a few tips to ensure your website is ready not just for the rush of customers but the associated press too:
– add a link to your media page
– add excerpts to your media page
– add excerpts to other pages or blog posts
– add their logo to your site to say “As seen in”

By adding these points through your site, you maximise the kudos appearing in the media has and it shows associated press that you are interested and will share their press coverage.

Share the press coverage

Only one person said that they would upload it to their social media, they said their Facebook business page first and then their Instagram. No one mentioned uploading the media coverage to YouTube.

The thing is you can’t and shouldn’t just share the press coverage once to each channel and forget it. Here are some ideas:
– share the whole piece of media coverage
– share screenshots with quotes taken from the piece
– share excerpts of your press coverage
– share the story from the media outlet’s channels
– thank and participate in conversations about your media coverage, and

do all of these across all of your social media channels a number of times. The amazing thing about social media, is that your fans will celebrate your media coverage with you and won’t mind if you mix things up and keep your social media posts relevant and engaging. So ask them to share!

Don’t forget to share with your email list too!

Chase associated press coverage

It might seem odd but it’s easier to get press coverage once you’ve already had it. Now you might not get good results straight away and pitching the same story generally has little appeal to associated press, but you need to strike and set seeds while your name is still buzzing.

There are a few ways small business can get their business ideas in front of associated press channels. You can call or email the appropriate desks in the media outlet. You can also monitor sites such as Help A Reporter Out (HARO) and Sourcebottle, where journalists post opportunities to be featured in the media. If you’d like to read more on media pitches, have a read of my interview with Kellie O’Brien.

Write a note to the journalist who featured you. A personal note of thanks is rare and shows that you took the time to put pen to paper and appreciate their work.

In the end, your first media coverage can be daunting but it’s important for the best small business to maximise the spotlight and put their business ideas out there. This media coverage affords you the opportunity to grow your small business and the best small business will run with these opportunities. Media coverage is part of achieving your business goals and growing your business and perhaps if you’re not sure what you’d do if the spotlight was turned on you then you might want to consider getting clear on your business goals and what you would do if you were featured in your local press.

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How to use the psychology of reviews to improve your social media marketing

70% of Americans say that they look at reviews before they purchase and 90% of customers say that their decision was based on the reviews they read prior to purchasing. Online reviews and other forms of social proof form an important part of a business’ social media marketing. However, as we are talking about the human behaviour of making a purchase, be it online or offline shopping, then we need to consider the psychology of reviews and social proof.

I spoke about this on a live stream, you can watch the replay or scroll down to continue to read the article.

Types of social proof

When we think about social proof, we think of reviews and testimonials; however it can extend to such things as posts, videos, and brand ambassadors. In fact, there are five main types of social proof: Expert, Celebrity, User, Crowd, & Friends.

Expert

The expert social proof is based upon our opinion of the person or brand providing the proof. This social proof is generally seen in the form of endorsements, comments, and paid ads. These work on the psychology underpinning the ‘like, know, & trust’ effect. It builds upon the relationship that the expert already holds with the customer & uses their underpinning belief that the expert knows so it must be good.

Celebrity

Celebrity social proof uses the customer’s self-perception and their desire to improve their position. This is where businesses can use brand ambassadors to promote their products. They do not need to use A-list celebrities, anyone who their client looks up to will have this aspirational effect.
A good example is Oprah’s Book Club, any book listed has become best sellers.

Users

This is what businesses classically know as social proof. These are the reviews, stars etc. seen on Facebook pages, Yelp, TripAdvisor, Google, and Whirlpool. Psychologically these allow us to put ourselves in someone else’s shoes. We are able to imagine their experience. This social proof concept draws directly from the psychology of the collective conscience.

Crowd

The crowd effect of social proof marries in with the User form of social proof. However, it pulls upon the psychology of the Fear Of Missing Out (FOMO). This is where businesses can use numerics, through number of items sold, to encourage buying behaviour.

Friends

Friends are an incredible influence online. Just think to your own activities, how often do you ask friends about specific brands via social media? Consider how you feel if a friend has an adverse experience with a particular brand. Businesses can dig deeper into the psychology of Friends social proof as it also applies to people we perceive to be like ourselves.

Why people provide Social Proof

There are six main reasons why people give social proof: Altruism, Reward, Influence, Complaint, Loyalty, & Fame.

Altruism

Customers will give you reviews because they want to help and they like to feel valued. In fact, just doing this can make them feel happy long after the actual event. Additionally, the act of providing the social proof can reaffirm the benefits they received from the purchase and reinforce that they made the right decision.

Reward

Some customers will provide reviews because they will receive something in return (discount, free items). This is where Brand Ambassadors fit, you send them items to use either free or heavily discounted in return for their endorsement.

Influencing

Some people will provide reviews & feedback so that they can influence (change) the product or service. They are sometimes doing this altruistically, so that others will not have to share their experience, or so that their experience is improved in the future. (social listening)

Complaint

Self-explanatory, but some people do just like to complain. While this one causes the most anxiety for businesses, showing that you can positively turn around a negative experience not only influences the behaviour of those making the complaint, but also those reading it.

Loyalty

This seems to be the pinnacle of desired customer behaviour. Brand loyal customers will spread their message far and wide. They will do it purely because they believe in your business & message. These people are most likely to be your ideal client.

Fame

Some people will leave reviews in the hope of becoming famous. Now this could be with their actual comment going viral, think of the Haribo reviews on Amazon. It can also be people posting pictures of themselves using your product in the hope that they will be seen by your followers. This ties nicely into the ‘Friends’ form of social media, particularly as this type of social proof is most effective when accompanied with a photo.

How can businesses use psychology of reviews in their social media marketing

Psychologists know that people are most likely to remember either the first or last few things they see or hear. This is called the primacy & recency effect. This is why large review driven sites will list the best reviews first. Businesses can benefit by doing the same. You can even keep negative reviews when using this format as psychologists have found that so long as people read positive reviews first, negative reviews will not adversely impact on their buying behaviour.

It is better however to not list any social proof than little social proof. Some suggest a minimum of 10 pieces of social proof. When customers see low levels of social proof they perceive the business as being ‘new’, ‘untrustworthy’, ‘or ‘not being used by others’. This goes against the psychology of Crowd social proof.

Likewise, businesses should be wary of 1 & 5 star reviews. These polar reviews can be seen by customers as either being too good to be true and as review numbers grow they can be perceived as less credible (especially if there aren’t comment accompanying the review). There is a psychology behind reviewers who give polar reviews, in so far that people will tend to exaggerate their views so as to compete for influence & the attention of the business.

In the end businesses need to remember that their reviews will be read and will be used by their customers to reinforce their underlying beliefs about the business. Negative reviews will reinforce negative perceptions and positive reviews reinforce positive perceptions. These perceptions & beliefs drive your customer’s behaviour to purchase from your business.

What to do when you are lost for blog ideas.

I admit that some weeks, I am pulling blog ideas out of thin air at the eleventh hour. With two blogs for two distinct businesses, I have used a variety of prompts to help me blog consistently throughout the years.

Why I blog

I blog for my website’s benefit. I blog purely to keep my website fresh & the Google Algorithm happy. I blog to help me curate keywords for my SEO. I know it’s not the most tree-huggy answer, but it’s the truth. It’s why I recommend it to my clients. Let’s face it, it is keeping one of my clients in customers – and her blog is hidden!

How often I blog

I blog weekly for Write to Right and I blog monthly for my hair accessory business. Not too onerous, except when the weeks coincide! I admit that weekly blogging is about my limit and that I found it difficult at the start. It used to take me 3 days to draft, mark-up, and do the corresponding email; now I can get it all done in 5 hours. Oh and that’s for a thousand word blog.

What I don’t blog about

I am not a mommy blogger. It’s not me. Don’t get me wrong, there is nothing wrong with it, it’s just not my style. I do not do paid endorsements. I rarely even do endorsements! When I have endorsed, it has been products I have used and happily put my name behind.

But what I will tell you are some of the ways I create blogs when I don’t have a topic. What I will say is that you need to direct your topic to your goals and to inspire your ideal client.

Q&A

Run a Q&A or FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) blog. This is a great way to help you with educating your clients. It is also a great way to develop business policy. It is also a resource that you can repurpose.

About
Write about yourself, what inspires you, what drove you to start your business. Open the doors to make connections with your customers and grow your relationships.

Product Review

Review your own products. Write up the features and benefits of the item. Start with your most popular products and build the library. Not only can you drive sales from the blog, you can add value to your sales pages. These are great blogs to repurpose across your social media presence.

Lookbook of tools

Create a curated post of links to your favourite tools or products and how and why you use them. Warning: let people know if you are using an affiliate link and you will get a kickback from their purchase.

Book of favourite FB posts

Facebook is a great way to test what your clients like. On my hair accessory business page I share a number of hairstyles, so one month I built a blog post with the favourite hairstyles I had done at home. This is also a great way to showcase relevant products or services and value add for your clients.

Use a magazine title from one of the niche’s fave mags

Magazines have tried and tested titles. Use their expertise and replace their subject with yours.

Counter a popular belief or stance

Countering a popular belief has been one of my most popular blogs. Provide a convincing argument, with counter-points to support your point of view. This isn’t for the faint-hearted. Promoting a counter-point to a popular opinion can give rise to an angry following, but if you have convincing arguments then you will be fine.

Do you have any other blog starters you use? Do you blog? Does your blog take on a particular style? What benefits do you gain from blogging? Do you re-purpose your blogs?

What use are client testimonials?

Let’s talk testimonials. So many businesses use them and many of us are wary of them. But honestly, what use are they? How can asking someone to give feedback on how you helped or changed them make a difference?

The difference for you

I honestly hope that you take heed of the feedback, good bad or ugly. Testimonials are generally positive, some customers will weave some constructive feedback in there, but most will be ‘love fests’. So build where you can, where you see a trend, and where you see the direction of your business.

Don’t be fooled by stars in your eyes. People who have done my Facebook Reach workshop or workbook will know that I don’t rate them (pun intended). Honestly, it’s a seriously flawed system based on averages. Guess what, if your customer writes a glowing review but accidentally gives you one star, they can’t change it. You’re stuck with it. Not to mention competitors, or their fans who stalk your page and give you one star ratings to dull your average. Don’t be fooled, it does happen, your Facebook page is just as likely to be trolled as the next – if you don’t believe me, then do some reading on Tall Poppy Syndrome. Still want to hold onto your stars? Consider what value a star rating is giving you over a written testimonial. You can’t share the star rating, testimonials can be converted into images, website feedback, added in product launches … so many options that star ratings just can’t provide. So move above the stars.

By asking for testimonials you continue to foster a relationship with your customer. You open your heart with vulnerability when you ask them to tell you what they think. When they respond, they want to make you happy, share their truth, and help you out – so they come from a similar spot.

Written testimonials give more information. They give personal experience. They also give a third-party account of your business. Did you know that prospective clients are more favourable to these than just you saying what you do? Why? It’s someone else saying how great you are and not just you blowing your own horn.

So what can you do with the testimonials?

Images images images! Seriously, turn them into an image! This way you can use them across your social media platforms for one! I did this for a testimonial from a coaching client, I made it for Insta, shared it to Twitter, and I used in on Facebook. One image that I can use over and over again. I couldn’t do that with stars. And you know what, a picture speaks a thousand words, let’s face it we are visual critters.

Add them to your product pages on your website. Once again, people prefer an independent account of your business over you selling the WIIFM. Embed them as a single image or put them in as a slider, whatever you do just use them.

You can have a testimonial page. Did your Gran have a brag book full of photos of her grandkids? She was proud of you right? So, do one for your business. Have your brag book. You would share where you were promoted in the media, so why not your testimonials. Remember, people like to see their name up in lights and these third-party accounts will help build trust in your business.

Sales funnel pages. Look, I’m not a fan of the sleazy sales pages. The ‘buy now, or you’re a loser’ or the ‘I can make you an overnight Millionaire’. Ugh! Puh-lease! But there is a way to direct customers on to your list and develop your relationship by using a sales funnel. You just have to find your way that calls to you and your clients. There is a place for testimonials on these pages. They add credibility to your product, they are an endorsement. They can help sway a person to buy your product or service by adding an element of ‘me too’ or ‘I know they have good taste, so it must be good’. So testimonials will generate sales.

What’s in it for my clients?

People love their 15 minutes of fame, so give them that. It’s validation of them as a person. Some want to see their name up in lights, it’s why fan of the week works. It makes people feel special, which is so great when we are having a crummy time.

So we know that they have opened their heart to you, by sharing their testimonial you validate their feedback and honesty. You thank them for their trust. You continue to grow the relationship you have developed.

I like to thank my business customers by giving them a link to their page in return for their testimonial. It’s a little thing, which takes no time for me to add, but if I can help drive traffic to their site or social media and help build their business I will. I mean, let’s face it, if I am coaching you, it’s my job to help you build the best business. My motto is ‘empowering business online’, so it would be remiss of me not to do all I can.

Overview

Let’s face it, it all comes back to connection. I’ve said before that it takes around 10 ‘touches’ before a follower becomes a customer. It’s about growing that relationship, showing you care, showing that you value them and your relationship. It’s about alignment. Testimonials show that you have touched them where they ‘live’, that you get them, and that you are giving your customers what they want. You’re on the right track. You can’t get all of this from stars.

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A case study on how businesses benefit from knowing their ideal client.

Do you know who your ideal client is? Do you know why you should know them? Do you think it’s something else you need to do? Let me show you how your business can benefit from defining your ideal client.

I first became aware of having a definition of an ideal client in the second year of my other business. I had just launched my website and within one week, I had my largest order come through. It was a new customer, they hadn’t ordered through Facebook or seen me at the markets and they ordered hundreds of dollars of hair accessories (yup, that’s my other business). Over time I have chatted with this customer and come to realise that when I focus on her and fixing her needs, I make more sales (not necessarily to her, but other women like her). I found it! I had found my ideal client! I started thinking more about other customers who had made sales easy. Be warned, affluent people aren’t necessarily your ideal client – so don’t just say that you want a rich ‘sugar daddy’ client.

It was eye opening!

I then used this information to build a profile and to use it when talking to customers online and at the markets. I could tell who was ‘just looking’ and who was going to buy from me. I could also then talk to their needs, show them the benefits, and use these to drive sales. It makes things so easy when you know when you are targeting. It also means that you can focus your energy AND you can make bigger sales to fewer clients.

So when I do a website audit, I ask, ‘who is your ideal customer’. Could you answer that question if I were to audit your website? I am yet to find a customer who can. Why? Most people say that they just want to sell to anyone. Well that’s fine, but then who are you writing for when you are writing your website or Facebook or newsletter or any communication you have with your customers?

You’re writing for your customers.

So who are they? How do you know that you aren’t wasting your time? Or, what are you missing out on because you haven’t defined and aren’t targeting your ideal client?

Here’s another example.
A client comes to me for a website audit. They want to increase the number of corporate clients coming through their site. I help them by auditing their site, suggesting keywords to include throughout the site, and then they asked me to make the changes. Guess what?! They are now getting new corporate clients saying they found them via the website. Better still, their ideal client (one they have admired for years) recently placed an order with them. Imagine their excitement when it came through. How did it happen? We added a focus to their site for their ideal client. It would normally take them days of normal trade to make the same money as they did from that one corporate customer.

So, have you defined your ideal client?
Is your website targeting your ideal client?
Is your Facebook page meeting their needs?
Or do you need help?

Contact Write to Right now for a free 30 minute call on how you can improve your online presence.
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Bust business beliefs

Alright, it gets to the point where a girl has to bust some business beliefs floating around the interwebs. This week, there are a couple of BS posts I want to bust. The first is about blogging and the second about Facebook posts.

There are an optimal number of words for a blog post

I call utter BS on this one and I have some good reasons.

No two blogs are the same. ‘Well, derr Kara that’s obvious!’ Just hang tight.

Consider your favourite subject and how much you would read on that, now consider stuff that you kinda find interesting, like celebrity gossip… So there’s a reason why tabloid posts are short, there’s not much substance to them. However, if it’s a topic which holds your passion you will read and read and read.

So I call BS to the ultimate 300, 400, 600 word blog and say – it depends.

What I will say is, make sure your blog posts have plenty of white space; so short paragraphs or quotes, or left justifying your text. These things create white space, areas where the eye can rest.

Make sure you hook the reader in the first two paragraphs. We scroll down a website, so you will need to engage a reader early to get them to continue to scroll.

Make use of the ‘page down’ key when writing your blog. For each press there should be something on the screen which is visually different; be it a picture, quote, a title, or a video. Each of these creates visual interest and encourages scrolling.

There are an optimal number of posts for a Facebook page

Ever seen that? You should make sure you are posting at least ‘X’ times a day. What a crock! Sure the more often you post the more likely you are to ‘catch’ your audience, but if you look at your Insights you will be able to see when they are on and target those times. Let’s face it, with all the hats business owners wear; we need to work smarter, not harder!

Not all Facebook fans are created equal. What works for a page followed by tweens and teens, won’t necessarily work for a group of middle-aged women, nor will it work for a group of male retirees. Their internet behaviours differ.

Not to mention that people get annoyed if they see you ‘clogging up’ their newsfeed.

Over the years I have been managing Facebook pages, there is something I have come to understand about the number of posts a page needs. The more people you have following your Facebook page, the more posts you need. (Tweet this) The magic number of how many will depend on your business, the demographic of your fans, and their Facebook behaviours. You can find your specific details in the Insights on your page.

If you would like to know more about how to run a blog on your website, or how to optimise your Facebook page, then contact Write to Right. We have a number of workshops and workbooks on the subject, we can work one-on-one to develop your skills and strategy, or we can manage it all for you. We believe in empowering your business

Three words to your elevator pitch

The Rule of Three – I love it. I learnt it in art. I apply it to visual layouts. Did you know that you can use the rule of three in business? (Especially in your elevator pitch)

The rule of three for business is something I learnt in a “Think on your feet “ course many years ago. The course was designed to help managers and business owners to succinctly sell their team, project, or business in any forum. It was primarily marketed as a formula for elevator pitches.

This blog won’t go through the course, but I will teach you my keys to getting to your three words. See, that’s what this is all about, getting you to a point where you can succinctly sell your business from just three words.

How will you use them?

Primarily, you can use these three words as the prompt for your elevator pitch. Use them to start a conversation, elaborate on them. They are there as a quick take-away for the listener. From the three words, you start a conversation into the who, what, why of your business. It opens up a way to pitch. It gives you the mental prompts to lead the discussion.

They can be used as tag-lines or by-lines, in social media descriptions, or at the start of the ‘About’ section of your website. In these places, they also lure your reader in to ask more questions, look deeper, investigate further.

Why do you need one?

Ever gone to a party, networking event, or been asked “So what do you do?” Having a three word elevator pitch is a quick way to answer the question. It’s easy to remember, and you will soon find out if the person was asking to be polite, or if they were genuinely interested.

It gives the listener the feeling that you are confident about your business, because you can quickly answer. Depending on the listener, they might also appreciate the brevity of your answer. Don’t forget that you can elaborate, but it should be driven by the other person’s questioning not your need to explain. (If you need to explain, then you need to revise your words)

How do I develop one?

At the very start, you need to work from your business goals and the definition of your ideal client. Your business goals, explain the ‘why’ behind what you do and the definition of your ideal client is your ‘who’.

Your three words should contain three of the following five elements:
Who – who is your client base
What – What are the key elements of your product or service (eg. Dentistry, accounting, furniture, accessories, jewellery, photography, coaching etc.)
Where – If you only service a particular geographical location, where is it; or if your service is aimed at one aspect of themselves or their business
Why – Do you have a point of difference; and
How – How will they feel when you help them or they by the product

So, to explain, Write to Right’s tag line is “Empowering businesses online”, my other business is “Stylishly simple hair accessories” (I know four words technically, but I only make hair accessories).

So, what’s your tagline or elevator pitch? Leave it in a comment below and link it to your website or social media profile.

Struggling to work it out? Have you defined your business goals & ideal client? The Write to Right workbooks are designed to step you through these. Need one-on-one help, then contact me to discuss how I can help.

Recycling is good for business

Do you recycle? Do you reuse? I promise you, I’m not talking about sorting your rubbish at home. I’m talking about recycling content you use on your blog or social media platforms.

There is nothing wrong with revisiting a subject and of course there are a number of ways to go about this.

Recycling

The easiest place to recycle content is on Facebook. I have discussed this in my Facebook Reach workshop and was well received. By looking at your Facebook Insights you can share or repost content which originally received high engagement, high reach, or another metric. Reposting content gives you the ability to:
– test which posts work best at particular times
– quickly add content to your page
– re-engage your audience, and
– boost Insights.
I have to say, there is nothing wrong with that. It does come with a word of warning: don’t repost something for about three weeks. I admit that this might seem like a long time, but not only does this give the regularly posting page the opportunity to have the original further down the page.

I have recycled blog posts in Newsletter mail-outs while I am away. Rather than burning out trying to create a bank of blogs, I have reused a previous series (read more below) as Newsletter articles. Not only is it a great reminder for clients, who may not go back through my archives, but it allows me to target new audiences and quickly get content to them.

Reuse

I admit that I love this one for my blog. I particularly like it for the “Top x number of ways to …” posts. I have taken the points in these posts and then expanded upon one as its own post. I will often think of a list of handy hints, but not have a lot of content to go behind each dot-point. With time, they develop into their own posts.

I have reused posts, or more accurately renewed them, when new information or products come to hand. Once again, I have the benefit of sharing with new clients, reminding existing clients, and benefiting from building internal links.

Don’t forget to reuse content from one platform to another, something which started as a Facebook post can grow into a blog post. Post the same content in different formats, try photos as videos. Of course there is always reusing content on a different platform altogether (consider posting the same article on another social media platform).

While I would like to say that this post is a ‘reuse’, it is in a way. I have taken one dot-point of a post lying dormant, waiting to be published, and used it to develop a full blog post. I find it helpful in times where I feel unprepared for my weekly post, time and life have gotten away from me, or I am plain old stuck for what to write.

So over to you! Do you recycle and reuse? Do you have a favourite time or occasion to use these skills? If they are new, what is the first thing on your recycling list?

Social media use in Australia & which platform to use.

For businesses moving online or looking to expand online, the big question is which social media platform to use. With so many options available, Write to Right has examined the statistics on social media use based on age. This allows you to target your ideal client by their social media platform use. Why is this important? It means that you can focus your time and energy on the best platform for your business and receive a bigger return for your investment.

In Australia, in 2012-13, 83% of the population aged over 15 used the Internet, 97% of these people had internet access at home. As at June 2014, there were 12.4 million internet subscribers  and 20.6 million mobile phone handset subscribers. (It is interesting to note that at the time of writing this article the Australian population was 23.7 million) On average those mobile phone subscribers downloaded 0.6Gb of data each month.

Moving forward and more specifically, businesses can use these figures to help focus their online presence.

When looking at Social Media usage, Australians participate (in the more common sites) as follows:

  1. Facebook – 13,800,000 users (steady)
    2. YouTube – 13,500,000 UAVs
    3. WordPress.com – 6,100,000
    4. Tumblr – 4,700,000
    5. Instagram – 4,000,000 Monthly Active Australian Users (Facebook/ Instagram data)
    6. LinkedIn – 3,300,000
    7. Blogspot – 2,850,000
    8. Twitter – 2,791,300 Active Australian Users (see calculation)
    9. TripAdvisor – 2,000,000
    10. Tinder – 1,500,000 Australian users (my estimation)
    11. Yelp – 1,500,000
    12. Snapchat – 1,070,000 Active Australian Users (see calculation).
    13. Flickr – 700,000
    14. Pinterest – 350,000
    15. Reddit – 160,000
    16. MySpace – 1200000
    17. Google Plus – approx 60,000 monthly active Australian users (my estimation *revised*)
    18. StumbleUpon – 50,000
    19. Foursquare/Swarm – 25,000
    20. Digg – 18,000
    21. Delicious – 16,000
    Statistics compiled by SocialMediaNews.com.au for February 2015.
    Stats courtesy: Vivid Social Research DivisionFigures correct as of 28/02/15.

These results are useful when businesses are starting out on social media, trying to decide where to focus their attention, or looking to expand their presence. There are extra considerations other than uptake. For example, your business may not be suited to the visually dense Instagram, but quite comfortable in the B2B environment of LinkedIn (or vice versa).

At this stage I can not find Australian age based usage rates for the different social media, however there is recent data out of the US, which can be used as an indication of what is likely to occur in Australia.

http://www.statista.com/statistics/274829/age-distribution-of-active-social-media-users-worldwide-by-platform/

http://www.statista.com/statistics/274829/age-distribution-of-active-social-media-users-worldwide-by-platform/

What I encourage business owners to do is to look at their definition of their ideal client and match that to the chart above. The next step is to look at the take up rates in Australia.

For example, my ideal client is aged 30-44, I am already on Facebook, Twitter, & Google+; looking at the above chart I should also be on Pinterest. However, the uptake on Pinterest in Australia is actually less than 10% of Instagram or Tumblr. So, my next step is to build my Instagram following, where I am likely to reach up to 30% of users; followed by having a look at Tumblr.

Another interesting consideration is the amount of time each group spends on each of the platforms. Looking at the time spent, I should be on Pinterest. As I said previously, there just isn’t the uptake in Australia to warrant me being there. It shows that the majority of my efforts should be on my Facebook campaign. Of interest is that my ideal client group spends slightly more time on Instagram than Tumblr and a lot less time on Twitter. Once again, I will focus my efforts where they like to hang out, taking into consideration just how many Australians use that social media platform. (Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr, Twitter)

Time spent on social media

If your client base resides outside of Australia (particularly the US), then I would recommend either beginning with a focus on Australia to hone your skills on a smaller market, or to target your efforts per the US statistics quoted herein.

All too confusing? Write to Right offer consultancy on how to define your ideal client and target them so as you can leverage your online business. The package includes valuable worksheets (which can be used when engaging any other marketing professional) and up to three hours of one on one consultation. Would you rather spend your time generating actual income in your business than on social media? Let Write to Right manage your social media presence. Book now as places are limited.

How to write for online

The key to social media is being social

Have you been following the expanded series on ‘how to write for online so you don’t look like an utter Noob‘? So here is your business checklist so far:
– you have a plan for the coming 6-12 months
– you know who your ideal customer is
– you have detailed your business mission & vision
– you have worked out what terms you will use (your style guide); so
– NOW WHAT?

Guess what, now you are ready to write for your customers. What? You’ve been doing it for a while? Good for you, now step back and consider this:
– Do you know where your ideal customer hangs out online?
– Do you know how they use the various social media platforms?

Unless you are lucky enough to fall into your definition of your ideal client, do NOT assume that they use social media the same way you do and do NOT assume that they want to either.

Websites

Let’s start with your website, Etsy page, Made It page etc. While I’m not going to tell you how to set these up, because they all differ, what I will say is this: whose need is it meeting? Don’t laugh, because the vast majority of websites I edit or visit are written for the owner’s benefit, or worse they are written in industry terms making them written for your competitors!

Consider the product categories, descriptions, and tags. Are they words you use to describe your products or services, or are they words that your customer would use? Go back to your definition of your ideal customer, their needs and where they crossed with your mission and vision. Now, are there words there that you can use in your description etc.? Why is that important? If you can:
– make it easy for your customers to find
– show them that you understand where they are coming from, then
– you will boost your sales.

Let’s face it we like to feel that we are understood, that our needs are important and are being met, and that we matter.

Do you blog? If you don’t and have the ability to add it to your site then I highly recommend it. Why? There are many reasons, but my favourite is to educate. But I reiterate, you need to blog for your customer (if you are running it on your website); that does not mean that all of the posts have to be about your products, in fact blogging about their other pain points can help to build a relationship (very important in building buyer confidence). Read more about the importance of blogging in my previous post (make sure you come back here though).

Before you read on, consider this:

Not all social media is created equal.
&
Social Media is there to be social.

Tweet this

Now read them again, consider where your ideal customer is on the chart above and then read the following points about the major social media sites.

Now I generally say not to post the same thing across Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. The thing is, most of us don’t have a lot of time and it is convenient for us as business owners. But, are we our customer? No! I’m not saying don’t do it at all, but as a customer I beg you, DON’T DO IT ALL THE TIME. Seriously, if you find it difficult then use the scheduling function available in Facebook or on your social media scheduler. By all means schedule the same post over different days at different times to ensure you have grabbed your customer where they are hanging out. Otherwise, give us some credit that we will see that you have posted the same thing in 2-3 locations, where we follow you because we love you, and we will wonder just how much you value us as individuals. Don’t believe me, consider how you feel when you hear mainstream radio play the latest hit over and over and over again, get sick of it & want to hear something different?

Time spent on social media

Facebook

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