Writing Archives - Page 4 of 4 - Kara Lambert

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6 ways you benefit from business blogging

write to right - business blog benefitsBusinesses will either start with a website and move to social media, or will move in the opposite direction. The next logical step is to move into business blogging. Some businesses start a blog with a clear purpose, others aren’t quite certain. While there are many posts online with content suggestions, I believe that it is equally important to know how your blog can benefit your business. With an overall benefit at front of mind, then businesses are in a stronger position to develop a blog. Here are some of the high-level reasons you should have a blog.

  1. Search Engine ranking

Search Engines will give your website a higher ranking if it is regularly updated. A great way to ensure this is by writing a regular blog post. Don’t worry, you don’t have to write a daily blog – in fact my other business only posts one blog a month and it’s on page 2 of Google (without any paid promotion).

Blogs are fantastic vehicles for your SEO keywords. Pepper your blog posts with a variety of one keyword or a smattering of a variety of them. The fantastic thing is that you can test either approach for attracting customers. A word of warning, don’t bog your blog down in keywords; the Google Algorithm is wise to these tactics and will penalise you with a low search result.

I previously mentioned how internal links can benefit your site. By linking between blog posts and/or products you drive the search engine deeper into your website, opening up more pages and improved chances to return a positive search result.

  1. Education

Blog are a great way to educate your customers. Tell them your favourite ways to use your service or product. Talk to them about the feedback you have received. Let them know what the most popular item is. People love to know that they aren’t alone in using your products and to learn how others benefit; you might just solve a need with something they already own.

You can use them to demonstrate functions, benefits, or points of difference. In a competitive environment, points of difference can make a sale. It may just be you sharing little hints, but these are points of difference when others in your marketplace simply sell. With an increase in online sales and increasing imports, service is making a return and customers will often value this more than price. Many customers look for value for money; if you offer an additional service you increase the value of your item.

Make sure you remember to put your customer first, don’t make it a massive sales pitch. When writing a blog, ensure you are outlining ‘what’s in it for them’. Many blogs, and books, are written from the industry’s perspective and what will help the person selling the item or service. If your aim is to educate, you need to put your customer first, it’s about what they want to know, know what you need them to know. How will X make things easier, cheaper, more cost effective, or quicker? Time is a big issue for most people, if you can show them a time benefit, you are on a winner.

  1. List building

Don’t underestimate the power of getting directly in to your customer’s inbox. I often have a Pavlov like reaction to the ping of a fresh email landing in my inbox, and I can guarantee that I am not alone.

People generally scroll through social media, just as they scroll through email. You won’t always have them opening your emails, but if they do you won’t have to compete with sidebar ads and associated distractions. Emails can be flagged for follow up, they can be filed and easily retrieved, and emails offer the opportunity to personalise.

Emails offer the opportunity of a back-up plan. They give you a way to distribute information if social media falls or your website crashes. You can inform them of outages, changes, and promotions (who doesn’t love a sale alert by email).

Email lists allow you to target customers who WANT to receive your information. They openly agreed to receiving your message, so they are open to it. They have given you a little personal detail; they have opened a door into their private world and invited you in. It’s a more personal connection, which helps you to build a more direct relationship. It’s these relationships which lead to sales.

By asking customers to subscribe, by email, to your blog you open up a direct line of communication. Email lists are a powerful, direct marketing tool which your customer opens up to you. (tweet it) Don’t waste it and don’t overlook the power of adding it to your marketing strategy.

Write to Right also provides proofreading and editing for blog posts. Please consider our services as part of your ongoing web profile. Our proofreading schedule is available on the site.

Blogging is just one way to improve your search engine ranking, find out other ways to get your website to page one on Google by filling in the following form.

Increase your Google ranking[lab_subscriber_download_form download_id=1]

14 Comments likes and Facebook Edgerank

Facebook comments beat likes with EdgerankHave you seen the post around Facebook detailing how a woman stopped ‘liking’ posts and it changed her Newsfeed? I’ve recently read it and I wondered how it worked.

I have done a little research (and I do mean a little, you only need to read up about the Facebook algorithm, EdgeRank) to find out how this could work. EdgeRank determines which content goes into your NewsFeed, and it doesn’t discriminate People from Pages (no one is immune). EdgeRank has recently become an unwieldy 1 000-factor beast that includes content quality, content origin (heed the warning Hootsuite users), and completeness of page details. The main determinants of if a post appears in your NewsFeed are still: Affinity, Edge Weight, and Time Decay.

The anti-like/pro-comment movement hinges on two parts: the Affinity score and the Edge Weight.

Affinity Score
The Affinity Score is concerned with how close/related/connected you are to an action. The more you have in common with the person or page undertaking the action, the more likely it will appear in your NewsFeed. So the more friends you have in common, the more you like or comment on their posts, the more you will see.

Edge Weight

Now here’s the thing, likes and comments are not equal. Most people know that, and let’s face it – how much effort does clicking like take compared to typing a comment? This is exactly why EdgeRank rates posts (gives a greater Edge Weight) with comments or shares higher than posts with just likes. Even the lowly emoticon smiley carries more weight than clicking the like button.

Lightbulb! To all the Facebook page owners asking their fans to ‘like’ if they see your post and still not appearing in NewsFeeds – now you know why.

Comments also provide the ability to interact with your customers, engage in conversation, develop your relationship. Even at an extremely shallow level, increase comments and therefore the likelihood that your posts will appear in the NewsFeeds.

I have mentioned previously that customers buy AFTER a relationship is developed, some researchers even say that it takes five ‘touches’ before you will get someone to buy from you. (I want to explore this further in the future) By encouraging a discussion on your posts and page, you are developing a relationship. You are opening up opportunities to educate and possibilities to introduce products.

Comments can also be seen as ‘third party endorsements’. I will pay more attention to a friend’s comment on a page than their like of a post. Why? I trust what they say and I want to know more. I understand how little effort a like takes over a comment, and I appreciate that effort. So when a friend provides a comment or feedback on a business post or page, I take notice. We all know how word-of-mouth works, and its power. So a comment on a post is more powerful than a simple like.

Now here is the issue, how do you get the comments? There are fun ways like ‘what’s your celebrity name?’ or you can ask a question. You can inject a little controversy on to your page. You can ask for advice. I have tried most of these on my other business page and to be honest, some work better than others (Your Easter Bunny name was a great one this year). As I have mentioned previously, it’s all about your customer and the voice you want to portray on your page.

I do know that comments and shares are extremely beneficial to your post reach and it has a flow on effect to the talking about numbers. The best of all is that if you discover the type of content which provokes comments, then you will find that the effect snowballs. The reach of the page I mention was previously around 10% of total likes, it is currently approaching 200% of total likes. Additionally, my talking about rate has increased from a very standard 1% of total likes to 4.5% of total likes. I will add that I have made a number of other changes, that saw an initial increase in talking about, and a subsequent change which increased the reach. Though none of them have has such a profound impact as providing content that engaged my customers and increased comments and shares.

Is there anything about running a website or social media that has you wondering? Let me know in a comment below & I will investigate and address it in future.

3 Winning customers by being consistent

consistency to win customers - Write to RightI have learnt from my other business that relationships come first and sales follow. When you are developing a brand, it’s important to ensure that you remain consistent. As a business, there are a number of things you need to be consistent with: your brand, your goals, and your customer.

A brand is much more than just your business name, it’s the experience that people associate with that name. It is this experience, which is the first step in building a relationship, which leads on to sales.

So if your aim is to have a brand that represents quality, integrity, service, and trust; if this is the customer experience you desire, then you need to ensure you are consistent. This consistent branding will help you to be consistent with your customer (and that’s half your consistency battle won).

Let’s look at your brand on your website

Most sites will have the same name, contact details, and logo across the site. If you don’t, this is a quick change for you to make. Ensure that any ‘contact us’ links are headed to the same contact page or the correct email account; any differences in these can leave a customer questioning if you will be just as inconsistent in your dealings with them.

Your name is a little more complex than just what appears on the homepage of your website. It extends to how you refer to your business and yourself as the owner. This is all dependent on the relationship your customer will want from you (professional, approachable, etc.) and the perception you want to build for the business (professional, approachable, etc.). You should have worked this out when finding your online voice, if not, I suggest you revise my blog posts on the topic. The reason being, and as you can see, these perceptions can and should align. If they don’t you are risking confusing your customers and missing the mark with your ideal customer. So when you are writing about the business, will you refer to it by name (full or shortened), using the term ‘we’, or in some other form? When you refer to yourself as the owner, will you use ‘I’ or your name? The decisions you make here need to be consistently applied across the site. This means within a page and between pages. Remember, people generally don’t like change – so keeping your website consistent will put them at ease.

Grammatical gremlins

Following on from keeping your brand consistent is keeping your tense consistent (past, present, future). I have read a lot of articles and sites where the author flits between present and past tense. Again, this swapping causes confusion in the reader. I encourage you to use the present tense for your writing. I choose the present tense as it creates a more conversational tone, it’s easier to read, and easier to write. That’s not to say that you can’t write about the past, it just means you need to consider how it’s written. In these circumstances I would suggest using a more active voice; where the past, and these are mostly achievements, is written in short sentences, using your key adjectives (check out the voice blog post on this), and placing your business name before any action or achievement. If you are writing about achievements, I would also place the year of the achievement at the start of the sentence. Having the date at the start of a sentence creates a simple chronology, building a picture of achievement in your customer’s mind. People are generally time poor: make it easier for them to know you.

A consistent brand makes it easier to build a relationship with your customer. It means that they know where you stand and as a consequence where they stand in relation to your business. If you consistently refer to your brand in a particular manner, it helps to place your brand in the front of their mind. If you match that brand with their experiences of the brand (consistent, reliable, quality, etc.) you will help them form an opinion around your brand. This is when you build a relationship, and you can then you can build on sales.

Building your brand takes time; consistency makes brand building over time easier. It means that you don’t have to reinvent the wheel. If you find consistency difficult to maintain, then I suggest developing a style guide for your business. I have previously referred to having a style guide and I suggest printing it out for your reference. Style guides are useful when you have multiple people writing for your business, including employing a writer (including website developers).

Remember, a consistent brand is the foundation of a lasting relationship with your customer.

If you are finding it difficult to achieve consistency across your site, not sure where to start, or are time poor please contact us to find out how Write to Right can help.

How to use your online voice Part 2

Write to Right - How to use your online voiceNow you know how to find your online voice, use these tips to use your online voice (and not sound like a dork).

Be mindful of your medium

Now you know who your ideal customer is, you need to hangout where they do.

You have your website, you need to make sure that you promote it at any possibility. This means sharing links, linking to it from your social media profiles, and adding it to your promotional material. If your ideal customer values quality, then make sure your website reflects this, have a look at our health checks as a way to ensure the quality of your site.

Facebook, this is one of the most popular social media platforms. I have written on where businesses fail on Facebook, make sure you read these tips (or print them out). Above all, keep it positive and sociable on Facebook as people use this platform to escape from the drudgery, catch up with friends, and have fun.

Twitter, this is a great place to develop your network and share information about your business. Because you need to be brief make use of a URL shortening service, some websites have their own, when linking to your site. Twitter users love to be recognised, so don’t neglect thanking and recognising follows and retweets.

Pinterest is primarily used for people who love to DIY, travel, interior design, beauty, and fashion. If your business has a product that is for children, fashion conscious, DIYers, or home improvers/interior design fans I would strongly suggest getting on to Pinterest. Not only is it a great way to advertise your products, it is a great way to find content for your other social media platforms, and provides valuable backlinks to your website.

Be consistent

Ensure your message focuses on benefits over features, your customer’s needs over your business needs, and you remember the medium.

If you are using social media, be aware that although people (in general) are not as concerned with spelling and punctuation, you are still representing your brand. If your brand represents, values, and your customer values quality then make sure that your posts/tweets/pins/instagrams all reflect this.

Ensure you use the adjectives that you identified earlier. This subtle reinforcement will speak to your customers who value these attributes. Remember that you need to speak to your ideal customer. You can also experiment with these words to discover which ones hone in on their inner most needs and desires. These keywords will then help you drive your business. They can then be used in other marketing materials. Be warned, your ideal customers may not all hang out in the same social media circles and what works on one platform, may not work on another.

Now this by-no-means means that you should use a social media management tool and post the exact same message across all of your social media accounts. In fact, your followers can be turned off by that. Some customers will subscribe to your newsletter and follow you on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, and/or Google +. If they see the same message posted across your channels they will know that you are not being authentic, interested in their needs, and they will feel that you are simply pitching to them. By now you know your ideal customer’s likes and dislikes, remember the profile, so make them feel valued and that they are the only one you are talking to.

Include endorsements

When you write a job application, most are looking for concrete examples where you achieved an outcome, not just the fact that you know what to do. Customers are no different. They want runs on the board, bang for their buck. Show them!

Write to Right Lynda review

Customers value third-party opinions. Remember the power of word of mouth. On your website, or social media platform, you can control how these are displayed. I am not saying to remove every bad review, in fact I advocate keeping them and using some strategies I have previously shared, you can actually turn the negative experience around. You may even help others to explain your processes, a situation, or a learning just by keeping all channels of communication open.

This can be done in many ways.

Facebook reviews – If you set your page to local or small business and include a physical address (don’t worry it doesn’t have to be exact), then you will get the review stars popping up on your page. Be warned, if someone accidentally gives you one star it can’t be undone and will effect your rating.
You can ask customers to leave review posts on your page. These used to be able to be highlighted on your page. They now appear in the left hand margin of your page. You can reorganise this left margin so they appear higher up. You can also hide general chit-chat posts, so they don’t interrupt the reviews.

Website reviews – There are many plug-ins you can add to your page. I have one on one of my WordPress sites which I populate with feedback customers have sent through. I have seen others where it is populated by the customer. Alternatively, you can set up an email form where customers can send feedback through to you.

Other pages will have a page of testimonials (like I have here). These testimonials can stand alone as their own page, but they are also a handy way to add credibility to a related blog post or marketing material (including a blog post).

Do it with integrity

For me, the key to all of this is working with integrity. People value honesty and integrity. We make mistakes, own them, own up to them, fix them, learn from them, and move on. This is why I believe it’s important to keep negative feedback in the public domain. Handled with tact and integrity they can prove as valuable as a positive testimonial.

In the first instance, be true to yourself. Most businesses, especially ones that come from a place of internal passion, are extensions of the owner. If you are not speaking honestly, and from the heart, you are less likely to do so with conviction, less likely to convince and convert, and when it comes to meeting the client, you are likely to be tripped up.

Be true to your customer. Now this isn’t just about owning where things haven’t gone as planned. It means being true to your ideal customer. You need to honour their needs, and place these at the core of your business. Print off your ideal customer description, find photos of them, make a vision board of them; all of these ideas will keep them centred in your work space and will remind you when you work.

Truth is easier to remember. Integrity will take you far.

Now you know how to find your online voice, allow me to help you reach your ideal customer. By using the process in this series of blog posts, I was able to focus my business and move it from page 16 in a Google search to page one. If your ambition is to have your business appear on page one of Google, then contact Write to Right about a website health check. This check will get your website in to shape and my hints will improve its ranking. Read more about the website health checks or if you are ready to be on page one now, contact Write to Right now.

6

Writing for online without sounding like an utter know it all

Write to Right - Finding your online voice part 1Ever wondered how to write about yourself online without sounding like a “complete dork” or a “know-it-all”? Finding that happy medium to sell yourself positively online can be difficult. The following steps will give you and therefore your business a strong, client-focused and cohesive online presence.

Know your business

Does your business have a mission statement? Do you know why you are spending your time in business?

If you don’t have one then this is where you need to start. These questions set the foundations of how others see your business. Here are some simple prompts to help you write your mission:
Who– who are you, are you a multi-national, family company, or sole trader? Who are your customers? Are they families, singles, seniors, small business, multi-nationals?
What– What is it that you do? What do you sell?
Why– Why do customers use your business? What is the benefit to them?
Where– Where can they find you? Are you a bricks & mortar, online, franchise?

Do you have a vision statement? Do you know where you want your business to be in one year, three years, or five years?

This is where you have to be SMARTER. Make sure your vision is:
Specific– No wishy-washy motherhood statements. Say exactly where you want to be, put a dollar figure to it.
Measurable– If it can’t be measured, then how can you look back and see if you have achieved it? It also means that it’s likely to be a motherhood statement and you are less likely to hold yourself to account.
Achievable– The goal has to be appropriate and able to be attained in the given timeframe.
Reportable– You have to make yourself accountable for the goal and the only way to do that is to make it reportable. That could be in your end of year financial report, quarterly reports, cash flow reports, stakeholder reports, or reportable to a mentor/friend.
Time-sensitive– The goal has to have a deadline. Don’t make it a moveable goal or you are less likely to set tasks to achieve the goal.
Evaluated– Is it reasonable, achievable, and how does it compare to others in your industry?
Reviewed– How often will it be reviewed so you know that you are on track?

I like the added aspects of evaluation and review. These not only speak to the quality assurer in me, they are best practice in project management. I use many aspects of project management in my own business, especially review. Many businesses underestimate the value of reviewing, especially when things don’t turn out as anticipated. I think I will write more on this in the future as I can see a whole blog post on this topic.

Know your ideal customer

Marketing experts have a number of ways to determine your ideal client. I use scripts to determine my ideal client. When you script your ideal client you write a little story about who they are. It’s like writing an online dating profile for your soul mate.
Demographics– What is their age (or age range), gender, family status, and employment status. This is all about who they are.
Preferences- What are their values, likes, and dislikes? Do they differ between the ones they hold personally, for their family, or for their business?
Daily activities– How do they spend their day? Do they work 9-5 in an office? Do they work part-time? Do they work in an office or from home? Are they running around after the kids? Are they single living a laissez-faire lifestyle? Are they retirees? Do they play sports? Write about how they fill their day/weekend.
Write up this narrative, and don’t worry you can have more than one (though it’s easiest to pitch to one client) and it can change over time. Just make sure you keep this person firmly in your sights.

Work out where these overlap

Where do your mission and visions cross? Are there any common words or themes? Where does you ideal customer meet with your mission? With your vision? List the adjectives, or find relevant adjectives, to describe these intersections. These are the words you use to drive your interactions. There’s a word of warning, they must be for your client. If you start writing about the business it becomes about you. You don’t need to sell to, or convince, you. Unless your ideal client is a competitor, don’t write about your industry either. Your customer doesn’t want to know why your industry does xyz, they have a need and want you to meet it. It’s why they are at your website/Facebook/Google+ (or other platform, more on this soon).

Go back and look at the list and where it meets your ideal client. What words help to meet their needs? What benefits are they looking for? Remember you wrote out their preferences, look to these for inspiration on how they want to be sold to and what needs you need to meet. Now, what are the benefits of your product or service and how do you meet your idea customer’s needs?

So now you have the adjectives to help describe your product or service and you have the benefits you need to include when you write those descriptions. But which tone do you use?

Finding your voice

Look at your adjectives, benefits, and your ideal customer – what language suits these best? Will they appreciate slang, a conversational tone, factual, or formal speech?

I would suggest that if your business has more than one person writing for it that you establish a style guide. While I use the Commonwealth Style Manual for proofreading, I also worked with a departmental style guide. This certainly helped when writing for different media and clients. There were guides for press releases, ministerials, client letters, and an overarching guide. Unless you are a business with a few hundred staff who communicate across many media and stakeholders, you are unlikely to need this many guides. However, a document that outlines your mission, vision, ideal client, benefits, key adjectives, and preferred tone is a great start. From here it can evolve to including which messages are distributed over particular media. You can even detail how minutes will be taken and distributed.

Style guides are beneficial for copywriters and copy editors. It allows us an insight into the back end of your business and means that we can easily support you and help you to achieve your outcomes. It also saves lengthy discussions when engaging us to undertake work for your business: saving you time and money.

In Part 2

Find out how to use these skills online. Learn how to customise your content for different social media platforms. Find out how to ensure your brand’s profile. Hear how to instil a piece of yourself into the business and online.

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33 Why you aren’t getting the sales on Facebook any more

7 reasons you dont sell on Facebook

Facebook is social media, not a sales platform. Here are 7 ways to be social, increase interaction & drive sales.

Facebook, although it has the plug-ins for shops, is not a reliable way to sell; it doesn’t pass on notifications or messages, it loses comments & if it gets really huffy it will stop you from accessing/commenting/posting. The main problem with selling exclusively on Facebook is that the content below your main page level (photos, shops, events) is not indexed for internet searches, so unless a person is on Facebook (and many people aren’t) your business is not going to make a sale. Facebook is part of the group of social media platforms, in the beginning it was quite easy to generate sales, however, user behaviour is changing. Facebook is returning to a social medium, where people escape from their chaotic/dreary/mundane lives. So, how can you help them to escape AND generate engagement, customer base and sales?

1. Laugh

Make them laugh, share a joke, share a funny photo, share a funny story. It turns frowns upside down. Best of all, research shows that if you help someone feel better, you feel better too.

~ People like to laugh; it releases chemicals in our brain that make us feel good. ~

2. Cry

I haven’t done this on my pages, but I have seen it done quite successfully. I have seen businesses share their struggles with cancer, when they have welcomed a new family member into their arms (be it a human or fur baby), when they have said goodbye to a family member, or when they just don’t feel as if they can continue their business.

I am not suggesting that your posts always relate to these things, too much doom and gloom does not make for a very sociable page. I’m also not suggesting that you whinge about not being seen in Facebook feeds, or declining sales – that said, I have seen a great spin on driving sales by tying the need for sales to fund a common purpose (buying a special birthday gift, wanting a new appliance). Just make yourself approachable.

3. Relate

I do this on my other business page, where most of my customers are parents. I share with them things I have done to make my life easier. I share with them if I have a bad day and need another coffee (or am waiting until bedtime/wine o’clock). I know of businesses that get fabulous interaction from sharing their struggles with mental illness, cyber-bullying or David & Goliath stories. It creates rapport and if your customers ever see you face-to-face it means that you have one less barrier to overcome – trust. If they feel that they already know you, that you are like a friend, then they can trust you.

~ People like to know that you are a real person, that you are not some faceless selling machine. ~ (Tweet this!)

4. Applaud

Certainly applaud your successes – business award nominations and signing a major retail customer instil confidence through third-party endorsement. Applaud customers who share their creations using your products, show them how proud you are that they have succeeded (and you have helped them to get there). Applaud friends in business, celebrate their triumphs and share the love. Remember that helping others makes you feel good long after the act of helping is over.

5. Teach

Set up a regular post and teach your customers something that relates directly to your business. My other business is making hair accessories and every Sunday night I share a hair tutorial I have found. Sometimes it is a way to improve a technique, sometimes it is a new technique, and sometimes it’s a new style. I have likers who tune in every Sunday just to see the tutorial. My likers will comment, tag and share the tutorials; all of which increase engagement on my page, improving my Edgerank and how often Facebook shows the page in Newsfeeds. I will occasionally share styles that use accessories and I will link to the related accessory in the post comments.

If you are in a service industry teach them something about what you do or teach them what they need to do to make working with you easier (eg. an accountant shares an idea on organising receipts for tax time). Teaching creates a relationship and trust; it shows customers that you are willing to share what you know with them.

~ Teaching opens a door. ~

6. Inspire

On my other business page I do this when I am making my kids’ birthday cakes. I share the photos of the cakes my kids want to have and how they end up. My customers love it, they are parents and like to see that human side and where my ideas come from (I share blogs I use for inspiration).

On Monday mornings I share an inspirational quote, an affirmation or a wish. It removes a feeling of doom and gloom often linked to Mondays. It makes me feel good as I believe that it will make someone’s day better and it reminds me of how I want to live my life.

Inspiring others not only lifts the other person up, it lifts you up.

7. Share

Ask them to share your page, ask them to share their fears, ask them to share ideas on how to use your product or ask them to share photos of themselves using your product.
Share your website, share products from your website, or share your blog from your website. Ask them to share their favourite items from your site in one post, get them to share it publicly in their newsfeed and to use a specific hashtag for it so you can see. Sharing your website does a number of things:

– it drives traffic to your site

– it increases your Edgeranking by linking to a verified source, and

– it is where your checkout is and where the buyers need to be.

~ People love to share things, so ask them to share. ~ (Tweet this!)

Facebook is a fabulous marketing tool, but it’s just that, a way to market your business. It is not a reliable way to sell your product. There are sociable ways to incorporate sales into your Facebook content; you just need to think socially.

Let me know in the comments what other ways you like to be sociable on your Facebook business page.

Want to learn more about writing for Facebook? Follow our two part series on finding your online voice.

4 Why you can write your own content for your website

Write to Right - The art of a proofreaderCopywriters are great, but they don’t know your business. When you are developing a business website, it needs to speak your customer’s language. It needs to be an extension of who you are offline. I don’t know of a better person to articulate that than you.

A business website is there to sell your products or services when you can’t be. Sure a copywriter can be briefed, they know the right words to use to get great search results, they can say the same thing a dozen different ways; but are they the right people to be selling your business?
If you were to engage a copywriter you would need to brief them on the ‘who, what, why’ of ‘you, your business and your customer’. Sounds to me you are doing a lot of the writing already.

What do you need to do instead?
Know your customer. How old are they? Are they a particular gender? Are they educated? What do they do for work? What problem are they coming to you to fix? How do they like to shop?

Know your product or service. What is it? How will it help your customer? How does it solve their problems? Why is it different?

Know your competition. How do they solve customer problems? How do they do things differently?

Know yourself. What image do you want to portray?

In my years of e-business project management I learnt to talk to the business first. They hold the knowledge and the vision, not the person building the widget.

From here all I can advise is to plan, write & review. If you will be maintaining your own website don’t be afraid to try different writing styles or tone; by experimenting you will soon see what appeals to your customers. Please plan your writing. Plan what website pages you will have, how your customers will use them (not just read them) & what you want to gain from the page. Put your customer first when you are writing.

– Put your customer first when you are writing. – (Tweet it!)

Remember that people want to know “What’s in it for me?” so tell them how they will benefit. You are the one who knows best how they will benefit. Plan the content. Write the most important benefits at the top of the page. Use visual cues, like bold or italic font, to keep their eye active and moving down the page. Plan these cues when you are planning your page.
Draft your pages in a word processing program. You can copy & paste from most and keep the formatting. You can move paragraphs around and remove any duplicated information.
Check your pages against your plan. Does it meet the customer’s needs? Will it adequately sell your business when you aren’t physically online? Leave it overnight and check it again tomorrow. Have it proofread (you knew I would mention it somewhere). After you have uploaded it to your site, give it a few weeks, a few months and review the page. Does it still help your business? Repeat the cycle.

– Plan, write, check, repeat – (Tweet it!)

Write to Right offer a range of proofreading and editing services for documents and specialised packages for websites. If you choose to write your own content, it’s prudent to have someone else check your work. Let Write to Right make your business communication its best.

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