asking for a review - Kara Lambert

I had an interesting discussion with a client of mine this week. They openly admitted that they needed to ask for more reviews. So, in true Kara style it had me wondering why we don’t ask for reviews.

Fear of rejection

What if they say I didn’t do a good job or they didn’t like it? Well, how’s about starting with the people you know like your work, your repeat customers. You know they  do like what you do – so start there.

What if they say no, they won’t do it? Well that’s ok too. You never had a review from them before, so them saying no is not a change. It doesn’t mean that they don’t like you (especially if you start with your repeat customers), perhaps they aren’t comfortable having their choices out on public display, perhaps they want to keep you as their little secret. That’s fine – you never had a review from them anyway so you’re not losing anything.

Fear of a bad review

“The only thing worse than being talked about is not being talked about.” – Oscar Wilde

Even a bad review gives you an opportunity. They give you the chance to show your customer service skills, to answer their concerns (I bet they’re not alone), & to show you do care. I will add the caveat that you shouldn’t get into an argument with them. Even just acknowledging a grievance can be enough for some – some people just want to feel ‘heard’.

I have to add here that we humans find it easier to lash out at a business that we really don’t know or we don’t know the face behind it. If you have a good presence, then you’re really not likely to receive bad reviews, because it’s in our nature to be kind. (Except trolls, they’re just in it for the 5 minutes of fame, delete them)

I’m embarrassed to ask

So has it been a while since you last had contact, then say that – ‘I realise it has been a while but…’

What if… ok, so I addressed most of those above. I can’t make you ask for a review, but by not asking you (and future clients) will never know what your business is like and you won’t benefit.

I’m not good at writing/calling. Then keep it simple. Add a sentence to the end of your newsletter, on your Facebook posts, you have to practice the ‘ask’. You’ll find a way that sits well with you.

Won’t I look like I’m bragging

Sure, some people might think that – but isn’t it wonderful that you have so many happy clients willing to share their love of you, your business, & your product? How many more people do you think it will help by seeing  their feedback? Isn’t it great that future clients have a wealth of past experiences to read and to answer their questions or concerns before they even approach you? Rack them up I say!

So my overarching advice goes back to:
if you don’t ask you don’t receive
-you never had the review to start with, so you’re not losing anything
-no doesn’t always mean never, it can mean not now or not that way
-if you don’t blow your own trumpet no one will.

Now before I go, I did write a post a while ago about how to make the most out of your reviews and which reviews work best. So, if you’ve now got the reviews (or you have some) head over and find out how to really work those golden nuggets.

So, if you have read my blogs, worked with me, attended a workshop, used one of my downloads, chatted with me about your business – I want to hear from you. Good, bad, or indifferent – any which way it helps me & others. you can comment below, leave a post on my Facebook page, or send me an email (just make sure you include a photo of yourself & a link to your business so I can give you a shout out).

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